Posts Tagged ‘waste energy’

SWAPSOL in Hydrocarbon Engineering Magazine on sour gas, landfill gas cleanup

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

This month, editors at Hydrocarbon Engineering Magazine, Europe’s premiere refining trade publication, took a look at the SWAP’s application in cleaning sour gas which has potential for dramatic savings for refiners.  A new outside report shows the SWAP can beat costs of traditional methods (Claus) by as much as 70 percent.

In early 2011, an independent comprehensive process design and cost analysis was commissioned for the SWAP sour gas application, covering a design for a typical well and one for cleaning landfill gases. The outside contractor was chosen because of his renown expertise in sulfur recovery technology and process design.


“What is clear from the data is that the SWAP can provide cost advantages over competing processes, especially in view of the fact that thecompeting cost data needs to be inflated for a four year time period. Compared to the industry standard (the Claus process), the SWAP provides a cost advantage in excess of 40 % (after adjustments for inflation); the advanced SWAP process increases the potential advantage to 70%.”

To read the full article, please visit the PDF.

SWAPSOL TECHNOLOGY MAY ALTER WASTE INDUSTRY FUTURE

Monday, May 9th, 2011

SWAPSOL Corp. announced its breakthrough technology that may fundamentally alter traditional methods for waste disposal and waste-to-energy operations. The SWAP, a suite of HC processing solutions is verified to reduce H2S to below detectable limits in a self-sustaining low-temperature catalytic reaction.

“Landfill gas cleanup may likely be the easiest application of the SWAP to implement quickly. This type of cleanup is expected to experience significant growth in the future as a renewable energy option,” said Wolf Koch, Ph.D., SWAPSOL director of planning and development. “Each landfill is normally a standalone application close to an urban location and requires little integration activities with existing processes.”

Waste disposal revolution: Landfills early adopters
The SWAP can also can destroy most common HC wastes via a reaction with molten sulfur, H2S and carsuls (a carbon-sulfur polymer), which will depend on the HC feed. As landfills accept large quantities of construction and demolition (C&D) debris along with regular municipal solid waste (MSW), they generate increasing amounts of H2S. That H2S may be reacted to generate usable sulfur and hydrogen. Carsuls may be utilized to yield carbon polymer materials. The sulfur may be used for destruction of additional HC waste.

SWAPSOL COO Wolf Koch

Wolf Koch at Landfill Workshop during WasteExpo

Turning waste plastics into usable polymers

SWAPSOL has experimented with the destruction of most plastics, including PVC and polystyrene, as well as used motor oils and cellulosic materials. SWAPSOL President Raymond Stenger said the utilization of carsuls presents potential commercial opportunities as building blocks for other materials.

“We’re very excited about applying this technology in the waste management sector,” Stenger said. “Given the wide range of opportunities, particularly within the waste management sector, we are already in discussions with potential pilot partners.”

Engineering & cost studies toward pilot construction
An independent engineering and comparative cost analysis has shown operational costs for the SWAP to be 70 percent lower than traditional (Claus) technology. These scoping analyses will form the blueprint for pilot development. Work is underway to identify potential partners in establishing the first commercial landfill application in mid-2011.

“We look forward to a successful demonstration of the SWAP will lead to further implementation of the technology within other industries,” Koch said. “We are already in talks with natural gas and power industry representatives discussing cooperation toward sour gas and flue gas cleanup.”

SWAPSOL presents its waste disposal breakthrough May 9 at Waste Expo 2011 in Dallas

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

SWAPSOL will present Monday, May 9 at Waste Expo 2011 in Dallas, where they will discuss the SWAP technology and how landfill operators and engineers can benefit by a near instantaneous reduction of H2S to below detectable levels in a low-temperature reaction.

They will also discuss the SWAP application in waste disposal – its ability to destroy any hydrocarbon waste to yield sulfur, hydrogen and carsuls – which may be utilized into materials.

WASTE EXPO 2011
Monday, May 9, 2011
10:30 a.m.
Dallas Convention Center
Landfill Workshop I:  Current Developments for Landfill Owners and Operators

Wolf Koch, Ph.D.
SWAPSOL Corporation

SWAPSOL has experimented with the destruction of most plastics, including PVC and polystyrene, as well as used motor oils and cellulosic materials. The utilization of carsuls presents potential commercial opportunities as building blocks for other materials.

The SWAP reaction has broad applications in other process areas, including sour gas processing and flue gas cleanup. SWAPSOL has presented its technology to hydrocarbon refining conferences in the United States and abroad.
www.swapsol.com

SWAPSOL SHARES LOW-COST LANDFILL GAS CLEANUP PROCESS DISCOVERY AT JANUARY EPA/LMOP CONFERENCE

Monday, January 17th, 2011

Operators given novel choice: Eliminate H2S and reduce CO2, or turn H2S into fuel

EATONTOWN, N.J. (Jan. 17, 2011) – SWAPSOL Corp. executives will be in Baltimore, Md., to explain how the Stenger-Wasas Process (SWAP) can give landfill operators a cost-effective solution to turn their sites into sources of clean, affordable power.  They will also discuss their latest research on directly converting hydrogen sulfide (H2S) into hydrogen (H2) for fuel. SWAPSOL will exhibit at the 14th Annual LMOP Conference and Project Expo at the Baltimore Hilton Jan. 18-20.

“Landfill gas cleanup may likely be the easiest application of the SWAP to implement quickly. This type of cleanup is expected to experience significant growth in the future as a renewable energy option,” said Wolf Koch, Ph.D., SWAPSOL director of planning and development. “Each landfill is normally a standalone application close to an urban location and requires little integration activities with existing processes.”

The SWAPSOL Sulfur Cycle

The SWAPSOL Sulfur Cycle

The SWAP
The SWAP is a suite of hydrocarbon (HC) processing applications independently verified to convert H2S with three possible reaction paths and may be applied to cleaning landfill, sour, flue, and other industrial gases. The process may be used to eliminate NOx, SOx, O3, CO, COS, and stoichiometrically reduce CO2 by using H2S. Alternatively, air may be used to react with H2S. Laboratory work has shown that the SWAP has the ability to also convert H2S into H2 for fuel. The SWAP reacts CO2 in the presence of H2S, forming water, sulfur, and carbon-sulfur polymers (carsuls). The alternate reactions produce sulfur and either water or hydrogen. The SWAP has been shown in the laboratory to eliminate H2S to below detectable limits.

No pre-separation required: Landfills early adopters
A variant of the SWAP has the ability to destroy most common HC wastes via a reaction with sulfur, producing additional H2S and carsuls. As landfills accept large quantities of construction and demolition (C&D) debris along with regular municipal solid waste (MSW), they generate increasing amounts of H2S. The SWAP eliminates the need for pre-separating the H2S, lowering operating costs for gas cleanup.

“We’re very excited about applying this technology in the waste management sector,” Koch said. “Not only can the SWAP clean landfill gas in ongoing operations, but operators may also use the technology to generate power from capped sites.”

Engineering & cost studies toward pilot construction
An independent engineering and comparative cost analysis is being completed to form the blueprint for pilot development. Work is underway to identify potential partners in establishing the first commercial landfill application in mid-2011. Koch said he hopes the successful demonstration will lead to the SWAP’s further implementation into the natural gas and coal-fired power generation industries.

“The SWAP is not a CO2 capture process, but a CO2 elimination process,” Koch said. “The SWAP vision is to enable carbon-emitters to profit by not polluting, to substantially lower their carbon penalties, and to earn carbon credits.”

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